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IHGG Courses

IH 201 A & B: Theories and Methods in the Study of the Interdisciplinary Humanities 

Introduces IHGG graduate students to the different methods of research employed in the Interdisciplinary Humanities and its constituent disciplines. This course, designed for first semester graduate students, explores multidisciplinary perspectives on a thematic topic with reference to the theme of The World at Home/At Home in the World. Each week, students will read between 250 and 500 pages of scholarly humanities writing in the form of books, theses and articles that address aspects of the theme, and they will synthesize and react to the reading assignments through reading response papers, seminar presentations, and guided seminar discussions. The course will offer the opportunity for student peer-instruction across program specializations. The semester may culminate with students completing a 25- to 30-page paper related to some aspect of the conjoined course theme. Alternatively, students will complete approximately the same amount of writing by submitting a larger number of shorter assignments. Specific themes, readings, and assignments will vary based on instructor interests.

IH 202: Study Plan Design

Guides graduate students through the identification of an area of humanities research specialization and the completion of a Study Plan.

The Study Plan course combines reading, writing, research, discussion, and lecture. It requires students to develop a tailored focus within the specialization and the broader IHGG program. It facilitates students’ progress toward effective and timely degree completion and guides structured communication between students, their advisors, and their committees. Completion and oral presentation of a Study Plan is the primary goal of the class, and is a signature exercise that is central to the vision of the IHGG Program. IH202 students meet weekly with one another and with an instructor of record (generally the director of the IHGG program), but they are also expected to work closely with their own advisors to define a particular field of research.

IH 203: Pedagogy in the Interdisciplinary Humanities: Theories, Methods, Practice and Assessment

This course is designed to guide graduate students through a “teaching as research” paradigm, culminating in a teaching philosophy statement for humanities instruction. In addition, it is a practice and assessment course that provides graduate students with an applied experience with “teaching as research,” resulting in a set of teaching plans for humanities instruction.

IH 205: Humanities in the World

Teaches students about socially engaged scholarship. The Humanities in the World course is intended to teach IHGG students about socially engaged scholarship. While the theme of the course will vary depending on instructor interest and expertise (and students may take the course at any time during coursework in order to select a topic of personal interest), the course, in every iteration, is intended to provide students with an understanding of the fact that humanities scholarship draws inspiration from the world outside the university, and that the products of our scholarly inquiry can circulate back to the world. The course teaches IHGG students how to incorporate social engagement into their research, their teaching, and their articulation of the university’s mission. In all iterations, students in this course study the various ways in which humanities scholarship engages with the public. Depending upon instructor interest, topics may include topics such as writing for non-academic audiences, digital archive design, introduction to museum studies, cultural resource management, or community based ethnography. Students may, for instance, learn to Page 56 curate photography exhibits, create web-based digital museum installations, write popular media articles and white papers about historical instances of climate change, use literary analysis to critique human rights law codes, conduct ethnography to understand barriers to healthcare access, or produce music and theatre in a performance context.

IH 206: Methods and Research in the Interdisciplinary Humanities

This course is intended to instruct students in a specialized set of methods and research skills that will directly inform and benefit their own research.

The Methods and Research course will vary in topic based upon instructor interest and expertise. The course will be offered at least once per academic year, students may take it any semester based on personal interest, and they may repeat it. In all versions, the course is intended to instruct students in a specialized set of methods and research skills that will directly inform and benefit their own research. Based upon student need and instructor expertise, the course may, for instance, introduce the use of geographic information science for analyzing and depicting past landscapes, it may teach students how to read a particular corpus of musical notation, it may explain how to use photography and video in ethnographic research, or it may teach students how to apply a certain approach to literary theory to a body of texts. After taking this course, students will be prepared to independently apply the methods they have learned to their own research. If the outcome of the course is the production of a completed work of publishable scholarship (or a website, database, performance, or exhibit) in a particular genre, the course will guide students through the process of completing and circulating such a work.

IH 210: Readings in the Interdisciplinary Humanities: Past Worlds 

This course will offer a cross-disciplinary perspective on a thematic topic with broad implications for the humanities, taking the perspective of the study of culture, human social organization, cultural projection, and sources of conflict in the past.

This course will offer a cross-disciplinary perspective on a thematic topic with broad implications for the humanities, taking the perspective of the study of culture, human social organization, cultural projection, and sources of conflict in the past. Each week, students will read between 300 and 600 pages of published humanities writing in the form of books and articles that address aspects of the theme, and they will synthesize and react to the reading assignments through reading response papers, seminar presentations, and guided seminar discussions. The semester will often culminate with students completing a 25 to 30 page paper related to some aspect of the course theme. Alternatively, students will complete approximately the same amount of writing by submitting a larger number of shorter assignments. The course is intended to assist students in developing exam field reading lists and dissertation or thesis prospectuses. As such, the development of a bibliography surveying the topic is also an important outcome. Specific themes, readings, and assignments will vary based on instructor interests.

IH 220: Readings in the Interdisciplinary Humanities: Social and Spatial Dynamics 

This course will offer a cross-disciplinary perspective on a thematic topic with broad implications for the humanities, taking the perspective of the study of culture, human social organization, cultural projection, and sources of conflict as manifested in social or spatial dynamics.

This course will offer a cross-disciplinary perspective on a thematic topic with broad implications for the humanities, taking the perspective of the study of culture, human social organization, cultural projection, and sources of conflict as manifested in a topic in social or spatial dynamics. Each week, students will read between 300 and 600 pages of published humanities writing in the form of books and articles that address aspects of the theme, and they will synthesize and react to the reading assignments through reading response papers, seminar presentations, and guided seminar discussions. The semester will often culminate with students completing a 25 to 30 page paper related to some aspect of the course theme. Alternatively, students will complete approximately the same amount of writing by submitting a larger number of shorter assignments. The course is intended to assist students in developing exam field reading lists and dissertation or thesis prospectuses. As such, the development of a bibliography surveying the topic is also an important outcome. Specific themes, readings, and assignments will vary based on instructor interests.

IH 230: Readings in the Interdisciplinary Humanities: Expressive and Imaginative Works

Offers a cross-disciplinary perspective on a thematic topic with broad implications for the humanities, taking the perspective of the study of culture, human social organization, cultural projection, and sources of conflict as reflected in the production, reception or content of expressive and imaginative works.

This course will offer a cross-disciplinary perspective on a thematic topic with broad implications for the humanities, taking the perspective of the study of culture, human social organization, cultural projection, and sources of conflict as reflected in the production, reception or content of expressive and imaginative works.. Each week, students will read between 300 and 600 pages of published humanities writing in the form of books and articles that address aspects of the theme, and they will synthesize and react to the reading assignments through reading response papers, seminar presentations, and guided seminar discussions. The semester will often culminate with students completing a 25 to 30 page paper related to some aspect of the course theme. Alternatively, students will complete approximately the same amount of writing by submitting a larger number of shorter assignments. The course is intended to assist students in developing exam field reading lists and dissertation or thesis prospectuses. As such, the development of a bibliography surveying the topic is also an important outcome. Specific themes, readings, and assignments will vary based on instructor interests.

IH 291: Seminar Series in the Humanities 

Attendance and participation in a seminar series offered by the Humanities Center or another campus research institute.

This course offers students one credit for attending and participating in seminars by visiting scholars under the guidance of an instructor of record. At the discretion of the instructor, students may earn additional credits by serving as discussants, assisting in organizing seminar series or conferences, or completing works of writing in conjunction with the seminar series.

IH 294: Individualized Study in Pedagogy 

Supervised pedagogy research. In this independent study course, graduate students will partner with an instructor of record, dissertation advisor, or teaching specialist to develop evidence for a teaching portfolio in humanities instruction. Portfolios should reflect evidence of scholarly engagement with teaching and learning from current teaching responsibilities; items could include signature assignments, classroom observation reports, brief articles (peer-reviewed or newsletters), or digital projects.

IH 295: Graduate Research

Supervised research. This course allows students to engage in an independent research project under the guidance of a faculty member. The specific scope, content and outcome of the research are determined by the student and the faculty member.

IH 296: Research for M.A. Thesis 

Research and writing of M.A. thesis. This course allows students to receive graduate course credit while conducting research for an M.A. thesis under the guidance of a faculty member, normally the student’s major professor. The specific scope, content, and outcome of the research are determined by the student and the faculty member.

IH 297: Research for Ph.D. Dissertation  

Research and writing of Ph.D. dissertation. At least one 297 course is required during each year following completion of qualifying examinations. This course allows students to receive graduate course credit while conducting research and writing for an Ph.D. dissertation under the guidance of a faculty member, normally the student’s major professor. The specific scope, content, and outcome of the research are determined by the student and the faculty member.

IH 298: Directed Group Study 

Group project under faculty supervision. This course allows a group of students under the guidance of a faculty member to engage in independent or group research, learn a technique of research or communication suitable to the humanities, or read a body of scholarly work. The specific scope, content and outcome of the research are determined by the student and the faculty member.

IH 299: Directed Independent Study

Independent project under faculty supervision. This course allows an individual student under the guidance of a faculty member to engage in independent research, learn a technique of research or communication suitable to the humanities, or read a body of scholarly work. The specific scope, content and outcome of the research are determined by the student and the faculty member.